Maria

Though she only has a brief intoduction to the baseball games of the USS Marblehead C11 as of this writing, I have developed quite a measure of respect for this industrious young lady. I’ve attached some of my web acquisitions as I develop my first female character to the story.

Maria L. Sanford University of Minnesota (Sky-U-Mah)

Maria (Mah-RYE-ah) is the perfect heroine for the promotion of the “Apostrophe to the Flag” and the 1896 US participation in the Greek Olympics held in Athens in April of that year. Speed trials, international and corporation secrecy about the speeds recorded coincide appropriately as well.

Maria was a leadership member in over 400 women and Daughters of  Revolution organizations. Imagine it, she never had a plane ride! Just buggy and train rides, round trip, from Minneapolis to just about every other state and back.

I’ve included excerpts from the Congress of the DAR where she performed her last ‘Apostrophe to the Flag’ at. It was this meeting (actually, three days later) when Dr. Hill’s remarks on the pending Bolchevik threat to American , their impact on the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution are manifest as visionary, when measured in light of our present un-American president and the actions of his appointed.

What a difference and what great similarity 90 years make! May 20th this year marks the passage this American heroine as that 90th metric.

In 1958 a statue of Maria was presented to the US capital (actually it arrived just before JFK was sworn in, Jan. 1961), as well as the attached proclaimation from Orville Freeman (named after an American airplane pilot), the Governor of Minnesota at that time. I remember him as the governor  that required me to bring 2 cents to school each morning for our ‘milk money’. It had been free from the Minnesota dairy industry prior to that (a victim of ‘Taxation WITH Representation).

Western Federal

A believable story about the beginning of Rocky Mountain Computer Troubleshooting…

westerfederaleye Not TOO long ago, this building was towering over Denver Colorado. Today, it is only visible on the Denver skyline at certain angles from Front Range peaks. Over 20 high rise buildings presently block this original “Western Federal” view.

When my son was only 18 months old, I had decided to dedicate a great majority of my own time,  time that I spent mastering the chase of elusive electrons from schematic drawings on E and D size formats, to tiny bits of plastic and silicon mounted on a two sided ‘printed circuit board (PCB) in the performance of a thing called, “Duty!”. Duty became an active verb of my style of Troubleshooting and provides a ‘segway’ to this story…

A partner and I were branching out from a ‘third party maintenance’ company named “Sirvess”. Ernie (The ‘faithful’ side-kick) and I had learned couple of mottos during our indentured service at Datum, Inc., as Field Service Engineer’s, to the creation of a set of business and  troubleshooting goals. Sayings like;

“Failure is the path of least persistence”

and from that grey monster, the USS Independence CVA-62,

“We Can Do!”

Using ‘mottos’, like those above, Ernie and I were skilled in Electronics by the United States Navy and ‘readied for Carter era small mini-computer companies (DEC and Data General) using DTL and TTL technology, businesses that purchased and resold objects called ‘mini-computers’ with peripheral devices like disks and mag-tape drives. Companies like, Western Federal, who had a ‘raised floor’ computer room on the 20th floor and a Loan Signing Palace, close to a very busy lobby, located on the 3rd floor.

Ken Flint, the President of Sirvess, had given Ernie and I the ‘go ahead’ to solve the Western Federal problem of having their computer located 17 floors away from their money making printer. The Data General built in interface expected a distance of 10 feet or less.

Ernie and I designed and built a ‘long lines’, 15 inch by 15 inch Data General printer interface using a 30 gauge wire-wrapped PCB, found spare connectivity in the elevator shaft, built two cables for the 3rd and 20th floor distribution panels and quoted a reasonable date for delivery, installation and acceptance.

Several well meaning friends of ours had already created a name for this company, “Mini Mag” – “Products and Services for Mini Computers”.

Ernie and I had ‘promised’ Ken that we would only do these ‘engineering level’ fixes to the ‘Sirvess of the Rockies’ customer base. If this ‘engineering solution’ required a service contract, Ernie and I promised to step up and fix it on our OWN time. Ernie and I agreed that who ever got the check would talk the Vice President into a week end response or after hours solution and  a 25.00 – 40.00 dollars per hour would be the amount we would perform this service would be billed by Mini Mag as a remedial hourly fee.

After the customer accepted the installation of the ‘Long Lines’,  I was very interested in the investment of my share of the project proceeds. The Vice President that sponsored our design and installation agreed to a check signing ceremony at a future date and I immediately visited the Jensen Tool facility in western Denver where I purchased this hum-dinger of a field serviceman’s tool kit (see photo above). It had every tool I could imagine, PLUS soft leather pockets for more junk, yet to be accumulated.

My NEW Jensen Tool Kit cost the same amount as that of our house payment. I took it to my ‘shop’ area in the basement and re – inventoried each item it contained, as often as I could justify.

The day finally came when I would be the one pick up Western Federal check, (the ‘deliverable’ portion of the contract).  I raced through the basement grabbed my tool case and drove downtown to my appointment on the 20th floor of the Western Federal building.

The Vice President asked if he could get a time and material quote from Mini Mag for any maintenance challenge that may surface after his company had paid Mini Mag for the ‘Long Lines’ interface. Having rehearsed our 25-40 dollar position, I calmly asked for permission to ‘open may case’ on his conference table, just to show off my new case acquisition. I spun the case to catch his expression seeing the grandeur of my tool box.

Instead, I saw a grown man frown, then start to laugh hilariously. I stepped forward to see what was in my tool kit and was shocked to see an over sized ‘RED’ plastic screw driver, a YELLOW plastic hammer of equal ‘non computer tool’ proportions and a BLUE playskool saw jammed in one of my soft leather pockets.

My 18 month old son, Kris, must have placed all of his TOY tools into my Jensen Tool kit!

“How much would you charge per hour?” the Vice President asked with a smiling face.

Red faced I replied, “Oh, there is NO charge for any trip(s) on the ‘Long Line’ interface during the first year. Our special factory warranty!”

Gone were all of the challenges of working for two masters, Sirvess or Mini Mag. I totally forgot about the $25.00 per hour, or $40.00 per hour, amounts that Ernie and I had rehearsed for just such a moment.  That seemed so unreachable after I opened that Field service case. In fact, any monetary amount seemed so inappropriate at that time.

I grabbed the check from the Vice President and adjourned our meeting.

Western Federal Needs

A believable story about the beginning of Rocky Mountain Computer Troubleshooting…

westerfederaleye Not TOO long ago, this building was towering over Denver Colorado. Today, it is only visible on the Denver skyline at certain angles from Front Range peaks. Over 20 high rise buildings presently block the original “Western Federal” view.

When my son was only 18 months old, I had decided to dedicate a great majority of my own time,  time that I spent mastering the chase or tracking elusive electrons from schematic drawings on E and D size formats, to tiny bits of plastic and silicon mounted on a two sided ‘printed circuit board (PCB) in the performance of a thing called, “Duty!”. Duty became an active verb of my style of Troubleshooting and provides a ‘segway’ to this story…

A partner and I were branching out from a ‘third party maintenance’ company named “Sirvess”. Ernie (The ‘faithful’ side-kick) and I had learned couple of mottos during our indentured service at Datum, Inc., as Field Service Engineer’s, to the creation of a set of business and  troubleshooting goals. Sayings like;

“Failure is the path of least persistence”

 

and from that grey monster, the USS Independence CVA-62,

 

“We Can Do!”

 

Using ‘mottos’, like those above, Ernie and I were skilled in Electronics by the United States Navy and ‘readied for Carter era small mini-computer companies (DEC and Data General) using DTL and TTL technology, businesses that purchased and resold objects called ‘mini-computers’ with peripheral devices like disks and mag-tape drives. Companies like, Western Federal, who had a ‘raised floor’ computer room on the 20th floor and a Loan Signing Palace, close to a very busy lobby, located on the 3rd floor.

Ken Flint, the President of Sirvess, had given Ernie and I the ‘go ahead’ to solve the Western Federal problem of having their computer located 17 floors away from their money making printer. The Data General built in interface expected a distance of 10 feet or less.

Ernie and I designed and built a ‘long lines’, 15 inch by 15 inch Data General printer interface using a 30 gauge wire-wrapped PCB, found spare connectivity in the elevator shaft, built two cables for the 3rd and 20th floor distribution panels and quoted a reasonable date for delivery, installation and acceptance.

Several well meaning friends of ours had already created a name for this company, “Mini Mag” – “Products and Services for Mini Computers”.

Ernie and I had ‘promised’ Ken that we would only do these ‘engineering level’ fixes to the ‘Sirvess of the Rockies’ customer base. If this ‘engineering solution’ required a service contract, Ernie and I promised to step up and fix it on our OWN time. Ernie and I agreed that who ever got the check would talk the Vice President into a week end response or after hours solution and  a 25.00 – 40.00 dollars per hour would be the amount we would perform this service would be billed by Mini Mag as a remedial hourly fee.

After the customer accepted the installation of the ‘Long Lines’,  I was very interested in the investment of my share of the project proceeds. The Vice President that sponsored our design and installation agreed to a check signing ceremony at a future date and I immediately visited the Jensen Tool facility in western Denver where I purchased this hum-dinger of a field serviceman’s tool kit (see photo above). It had every tool I could imagine, PLUS soft leather pockets for more junk, yet to be accumulated.

My NEW Jensen Tool Kit cost the same amount as that of our house payment. I took it to my ‘shop’ area in the basement and re – inventoried each item it contained, as often as I could justify.

The day finally came when I would be the one pick up Western Federal check, (the ‘deliverable’ portion of the contract).  I raced through the basement grabbed my tool case and drove downtown to my appointment on the 20th floor of the Western Federal building.

The Vice President asked if he could get a time and material quote from Mini Mag for any maintenance challenge that may surface after his company had paid Mini Mag for the ‘Long Lines’ interface. Having rehearsed our 25-40 dollar position, I calmly asked for permission to ‘open may case’ on his conference table, just to show off my new case acquisition. I spun the case to catch his expression seeing the grandeur of my tool box.

Instead, I saw a grown man frown, then start to laugh hilariously. I stepped forward to see what was in my tool kit and was shocked to see an over sized ‘RED’ plastic screw driver, a YELLOW plastic hammer of equal ‘non computer tool’ proportions and a BLUE playskool saw jammed in one of my soft leather pockets.

My 18 month old son, Kris, must have placed all of his TOY tools into my Jensen Tool kit!

“How much would you charge per hour?” the Vice President asked with a smiling face.
[AMAZONPRODUCTS asin="B000IU0I7W"]
Red faced I replied, “Oh, there is NO charge for any trip(s) on the ‘Long Line’ interface during the first year. Our special factory warranty!”

Gone were all of the challenges of working for two masters, Sirvess or Mini Mag. I totally forgot about the $25.00 per hour, or $40.00 per hour, amounts that Ernie and I had rehearsed for just such a moment.  That seemed so unreachable after I opened that Field service case. In fact, any monetary amount seemed so inappropriate at that time.

I grabbed the check from the Vice President and adjoined our meeting.

 

 

Play Chess Against the Computer – Chess.com

Hello again, John Here, just waiting for you to participate in the DirecTV project. (If you already have, THANKS!) If you have or have not signed-up, here is chess puzzle of sorts for you. Perhaps focusing your mental powers on a game of chess will make the DirecTV project more appealing to you? You could just like to play chess, once in a while?

Here is a Computer for you to test out your Chess knowledge. Just try one game and email johnh@dctlan.com

Play Chess Against the Computer – Chess.com.

John (me), can often be found on http://www.chess.com playing as ‘joenovell’.

End of January

With the end of January, a lot of birthdays happen, all at once, almost. On January 26th, Dutchess has a birthday. On the 28th, Cousin Billy. (I was at dinner with Don and Nancy when we left Los Gringos Loco, this LAST 28th, Nancy called Cousin Bill and I really do have a hankering for a trip to Laughlin, NV)

Afterwards, Valerie and I visited with Don and Nancy and I was struck with her memory preceding mine. Nancy really ‘loved’ Bernice’s house and remembered visiting there for Christmas when I was very young. She said, “I want to visit that house and walk around on my knees!” I know exactly what she means. that would have been totterer hight back that number of years. I remember seeing scared faces from that buffet, like my sister Gloria’s face, finding me up on that buffet, while baby sitting, or, Duchesses’ begging me to come down from the uncomfortable top of that buffet, before another baby sitter found us!

It was such a Grand house!

Dutchess, Bix and Nancy where there before we can possibly remember! I do wish you would make time to come out west and visit your relatives.

And then on the 29th, Allen Wheland has HIS birthday. January is such a very good month for birthdays.

PineBox Derby Winners

There was only a handful of days in my life that I actually did a soap box derby. I was involved long before fathers took the event over. My Dad was busy printing the St. Paul Dispatch – Pioneer Press the day I built a soap box racer. I had plenty of competition though with 5 other young men trashing their sister’s baby carriage(s) (for wheels) and borrowing my Dad’s hammer, nails and saw to put my entry and the 5 contenders’, together.

We had an acceptable hill on Goodrich at Dunlap with almost zero traffic, after Summit school let out.

I never made it to Eagle Scout. I had a good run at it and did have a bunch of merit badges at the Life scout level. My Grandson Gregory recently made Eagle Scout. (The one I have to hand it to, he is the one with the Afro Doo! BTW all 6 of my grandsons are in this photo! (some kind of record!) And, he is the older brother to this Pinebox DerbyJackson, Bryan and GunnerI feel almost as proud as Gregory. Look what these guys have done! winning trio.

I am not old enough to be a grand father, but I am!

- It's about data -

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